camping food





What you need for day hiking?

Cats: campingsupplies
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Fri - 07 Aug 2009 - 08:40 PM

The day hiking gear list is much lighter than the overnight gear list, but should still have many survival essentials, in case you end up needing to spend extra time in the woods. Getting lost, getting injured, or simply having your hike take longer than expected could have you needing gear that you did not expect to need.

 Water: Assuming you are hiking in an area with plenty of natural water supplies, pack about a liter of water, and bring along a purification system. Iodine tabs are great because they come in a tiny bottle that weighs only about one ounce. Another option is a small filter. This is heavier, but leaves the water tasting better.

 Food: Bring enough food for at least a day longer than you expect to be on the trail. This does not need to be complicated, just throw a few extra candy bars in your day pack, for example. It’s just about survival. You don’t want to get weak because you are suffering from hunger after you have gone 12 or 18 hours without food.

 Clothing: Pack a change of clothing, in case the set you are wearing gets wet. Also, pack something warm enough to get you through the night if something happens requiring you to stay out there. An example would be, in the summer, pack a sweater, fleece pants and a hat. Keep your spare clothes in a plastic bag. Pack rain gear, even if rain is not predicted.

 Navigation: Always carry a compass and a detailed map of the area you are hiking in. It is very easy to find yourself off of your intended trail, and once this happens it is even easier to get disoriented. A compass and a map can tell you which direction to go to get back to the trail, or to a road, etc. If you have a GPS, bring it, but also pack that compass, because a GPS could fail for a number of reasons.

 First Aid: Pack a small first aid kit. There are some very good, lightweight options available at outdoor supply stores.

 Before you leave, let someone know your intended route, so if something happens, they can effectively initiate a search for you. By all means, be prepared. You can start by checking out a guide that shows you how to pack emergency gear, that will keep you alive.

What you need for day hiking?

What you need for day hiking?

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What kind of food is good for camping?

Cats: campingsupplies
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Fri - 07 Aug 2009 - 08:13 PM

There are a few things to consider when you are trying to decide what kinds of food to bring camping. Assuming you are not camping by the side of the road, anything you eat will have to be carried on your back, along with the cooking and cleaning gear, and the plate and utensils, etc.

For backpacking camping, plan to have one hot meal per day, usually dinner. You can survive without heat meals, but it is very psychologically beneficial to have one. There are many prepackaged just-add-water type backpacking meals available in your local camping store. These are great for dinners, and the choices vary from spaghetti and meatballs to beef stroganoff. These really taste excellent when you are in the woods after a day of hiking. Anything you make from scratch is either going to be very difficult to prepare in the woods, or is going to very simple and bland. Also, consider the cleanup. The prepackaged meals are the best for a hot meal.

For breakfast, lunch and snacks, choose foods that have a high calorie to weight ratio and don’t need any preparation. Examples are peanut butter, nuts, cheese, and dried meats. These contain a lot of energy for the amount they weigh. Avoid foods that have a lot of water as it is unnecessary weight that doesn’t add energy. Examples of this are fresh fruit, pre made soup, and pre made stew. These foods don’t make a lot of sense to include when backpacking. Don’t worry about getting a balanced diet, unless you will be camping for an extended period of time, just focus on adequate caloric intake. And save time, space, and money with these 580 easy camping recipes.

What kind of food is good for camping

What kind of food is good for camping

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What to bring camping?

Cats: campingsupplies
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Fri - 07 Aug 2009 - 07:57 PM

What to bring camping is a topic that will include alot of common sense items, as well as, some things that can easily be overlooked, yet are potentially crucial to your camping adventure.

A simple list by a young friend, provides an overview of essential things to include in your pre-camping checklist:

When we go camping we should bring our own clothes. Certainly, also bring our own towel to wipe when we need. It may be helpful to also bring our own comb to comb our hair. A lightweight flashlight will always be useful to us so that we can see things when the lights go out. We can carry our own pillows so that we can rest our heads comfortably in the night. Some sheets to cover ourselves so that we can protect ourselves from the chills in the night. Taking our own soaps can prevent skin problems while away on your hike. We should also take a mosquito coil and a matchbox with us so that we can sleep peacefully in the night if there is lot of mosquitoes, although some prefer a bug net. Think about taking general medicines to help from sickness during camping. Take your mug with and you will be surprised the many uses, for instance bathing and other activities which require the carrying or use of liquids or water. Take your own handkerchiefs so that you won’t get unneeded germs from other people, in the event one falls ill. Bandages are lightweight, and helpful in case of minor cuts or wounds during camping and hiking. Some also suggest to take ear plugs with us so that we can sleep peacefully in the night if there is lot of noise. We should also have our own cell phone with us so that we can keep in touch with friends if we are lost. We can even keep in touch with family members during that time.

Of course, these are only a few of the items which can provide you with a fully prepared pack for your trip, but at least you get thinking about what personal items you feel are essential for you. And if this is a get-away trip, to relieve you of stresses from the daily work environment, you may consider keeping that cell phone off for the entire trip, and only use it for emergencies. Either way you can cut camping headaches with advice from experienced experts. Start by checking out these “12 Steps”

 

What to Bring Camping

What to Bring Camping

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